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Full text of "Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin. Number 50, April 1915"

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PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



The Governok w imv State, Ex-Of. , The Mayok .^r mi-, y.ni, t-.x-tij. 

Mrs. Rudolph Hlankenbukg Chari.es H. Harding John W. Pepper 

Charles Bond Thomas Skelton Harrison Theodore C. Search 

James BuTTERwoRtn Joh.n- Story Jenks; Edgar V. Seeler 

John G. Carruth John H. McFaddun Mrs. Joseph P. Sinnoi i 

Harrington Fitzgerai.h John D. McIlhenny Edward T. Stotesbury 

Mrs. Henry S. Grove Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs James F. Sullivan 

John Gribbel John T. Morris William Wood 

©fftcere 

• THEODORE C. SEARCH. President 

JOHN p. CARRUTH, i 
JAMES BUTTERWORTH. Treasurer 
EDWIN ATLEE BARBER. Secretary 
LESLIE W. MILLER. Principal of the School 



JOHN STORY JENKS, „„,^p,„y„„ 



EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, Editor 



Bulletin 



jTor Bpill, Ulinetcen MunDre& nrib fifteen 
CONTENTS 

1....0 .>vc» „ ^..i.ian runiitui'e 

Memorial to Miss Anna Phillips Stevenson 

Cast Iron Stoves of the Pennsylvania Germans .... 
Etruscan Antefix, etc., ff^'" '1 "•''"'■"■'■•" T"""""-* ... 

Franklin Pitcher . . ... 

Copy of " The Lady and the Uniuortx " Tapestry .... 

Notes 

Accessions 

General Information 



BULLETIN 

OF 

THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



APRIL, 1915 



THIRTEENTH YEAR 



Number 50 



MISS LEA'S ITALIAN FURNITURE 

The very elaborate set of Italian furniture which Miss Nina Lea has 
presented to the Pennsylvania Museum is now installed in a loom assigned to 
the style and period which it represents. The ground work of the furniture 




Painted and Gilt Furniture. Venice 

Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 

Gift of Miss Nina Lea 



If 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



is of a deep red shade with elaborate gilt gesso moldings and painted panels in 
the taste of the late eighteenth century. It seems evident that all the pieces 
of the very large set were not made at the same time. Some parts bear unmis- 
takable signs of age and probably go back to the period mentioned, while others 
must have been made to match in later times as the need was felt. 




Bedstead. Painted and Gilt. 
Nineteenth Century 
Gift of Miss Nina Lea 



Venice 



Miss Lea purchased the set in Venice. The dealer from whom it was 
acquired stated that it had belonged to the late Marchese Bellisori of Monte 
Vecchio in the province di Padova, who had inherited it from his parents. 
These lived in Venice and among their ancestors counted a Doge. However 
this may be, the set forms a most striking addition to the Museum's collection 
of furniture, and is remarkably handsome. S. Y. S. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 19 

A COLONIAL ROOM MEMORIAL TO MISS ANNA PHILLIPS 

STEVENSON 

Mrs. Frederick Thurston Mason's old colonial memorial room, erected at 
the Pennsyh-ania Museum, Memorial Hall, in commemoration of her sister. 
Miss Anna P. Ste\'enson, is now approaching completion. Mrs. Mason has 
gathered together some of the furniture which came to her share in the division 
of her late sister's possessions, and has been picking up from time to time since 
her death good pieces of genuine age to complete the room. Thus she has 
furnished an old fashioned apartment, the quaint charm of which is most rest- 
fully attractive and the resiilt is decidedly pleasing — ^if one may judge by the 
attention it attracts from the hundreds of daily \'isitors to the Museum. 

Mrs. Mason is still looking for certain adjuncts to a colonial room which 
doubtless will be found in the course of time, but to all intents and purposes 
she has completed her labor of love. 

Miss Stevenson was much attached to the old American furnishings, ball 
and claw furniture and all the accessories of a house in Colonial times, and 
the memorial is a most appropriate one. 

S. Y. S. 



CAST IRON STOVES OF THE PENNSYLVANLA. GERMANS 

The art of casting decorated iron stoves and stove plates was brought to 
America by German settlers in the first quarter of the eighteenth century. 
The earliest example which has thus far been found in the Pennsylvania- 
German districts bears the date of 1726. 

As announced in the previous issue of the Bulletin, the Museum series 
of stove plates has recently been increased by eleven rare examples, all new to 
the collection, the gift of Mr. John T. Morris. At this most opportune 
moment, an exhaustive study of these castings, by Mr. Henry C. Mercer, 
has appeared, under the title of "The Bible in Iron, or The Pictured Stoves 
and Stove Plates of the Pennsylvania-Germans," and since the majority of the 
identical examples presented b}^ Mr. Morris are figured and described in this 
work, we cannot do better than quote at length from the author's descriptions 
of the more important of these designs. 

Saint George and the Dragon 

Front plate of a Jamb Stove. Size, W. 21^2 x H. 23. 

Saint George on horseback, in a nondescript flowing costumxC, rides against 
the open-mouthed dragon, as he pierces him with a long lance held in his right 
hand. The date 1746 fills the sky to the left, and upon a hill on the back- 
ground to the right rise the trees of a forest, where upon a leafless branch, a 
bird is perched. 



20 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 




Saint George and the Dragon 



The picture without decorative 
framework or canopy fills the whole 
upper panel, but the inscription 
below, originally in three lines, seems 
to have been mutilated by some 
person who, by boring a series of 
holes through the iron, has con- 
trived to break off the entire bottom 
of the margin, and with it the third 
line of the legend, unfortunately 
leaving us with two lines only and 
the words 

DER. STARCKE. RITER. 
lORG. DEN. TODTEN. 

Shearwell Furnace Plate 

Right plate. Size, about H. 
23 X W. 24. 

It has been known that there 
was an old furnace, known as Oley 
Furnace, near the town of Oley, 
Berks County, Pa., owned by Chris- 
tian Sower and Jacob Weiner, and 



built, according to a date stone from the furnace stack, now (1913) at the 



Berks County Historical Society' 
stoves. But that an earlier 
furnace called Shearwell, built 
between 1744 and 1760, and 
still in blast in 1782, stood 
near the former upon the same 
propert}', was not known until 
Mr. B. F. Owen proved the 
fact, not only by title-deeds, 
but by discovering a replica 
of this interesting old plate. 

Benedict Swoope was part 
owner with Dietrich (Dieter) 
Welckcr in 1760. 

The Man on Horseback 

Right plate of Jamb Stove. 
Size, W. 201/2 X H. 233-^. 

Under a vaulted canopy 
filled in with a large rococo 
scroll, a man with a broad- 
brimmed hat, and probably 



in 1772, after the abandonment of decorated 




Plate from She.\rwell Fvrnace 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



21 




// 



^ 



K< 






holding a staff or sword, on horse- 
back. Below in a small medallion 
the date 1756. 

(Note. — Mr. Mercer favors the supposition 
that this plate was made by William Bird at the 
Berkshire Furnace, in Berks County. Pa., since a 
front plate embellished with the same device has 
been discovered w-hich bears m addition, above the 
date, the initials W.B. Some believe that the man 
in Quaker garb is intended to represent William 
Penn.) 

The Four Horsemen 

Left plate of Jamb Stove. Size, 
W. 24 X H. 22}4. 

Three angels flying in mid-air 
direct or inspire two pairs of horse- 
men, in the dress of about 1750, as 
they ride toward each other across 
a waved foothold, converging into 
a central hollow. 

The plate bears no date or in- 
scription, but is divided as usual 
into two panels, in the lower of 
which the large blank date medal- 
lion shows cross cuts upon its in- 
cluded surface, as of the impressions of a wooden mould roughed for the 
insertion of the inscription, car\Td or otherwise made in a loose jiiece, 

and here intended to be set on 
with glue, mastic or plaster of 



ll. 



.!■ i 



Prob.\bly from the Berkshire Furn.^ce 



^^Srx:^.. 



,:,jSife;'*- > * ^ .s>- 



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f its- 



^ .-^y^r-^t^" -.-y^' r 




The Four Horsemen 



Paris 

Samson and Delilah 

Right plate. Size, H. 
24K X W. 24:54. 

Two corbels and a smooth 
central coluinn support the 
double canopy with under- 
hanging horizontal curtains. 
Beneath the right arch, Sam- 
son carries the left wing of a 
vault door cross-marked with 
two heavy' strap hinges (The 
Gate of Gaza) , while under the 
left vault, a figure (again 
Samson) reclines on the lap 
of a woman, seated on a chair, 
the back of which ends in a 
knob. A male figure ap- 



22 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 




Samson and Delilah 



proaches from the left, with 
extended arms, probably hold- 
ing scissors, or a razor, as if 
about to cut the strong man's 
hair. Heavy foliate scrolls 
fill the background to the right 
and left, and the lower panel, 
divided into three horizontal 
bands, is filled with the in- 
scription : 

ALS. ENDLICH. DELILA. WUST. 

SIMSONS. KRAFT. ZU. ZWINGEN. 

LIES. SIE. AUF. IHREM. 

SCHOS. IHN. UM. DESELBE. 

BRINGEN. DAS. B. RICHTER. 16. 

"When at last Delilah 
learned how to overcome Sam- 
son's strength, she brought 
him to it on her lap." The 
Book of Judges, 16. 



The Dance of Death 

In addition to the gift of Mr. Morris, the Museum has acquired by 
purchase a complete five-plate stove, or jamb stove, decorated on each side 
with the Todtentanz, or Dance of Death pattern, and front plate bearing a 
conventional floral and scrolled de- 
sign above the date 1749. Beneath 
the figure scene on each side is the 
inscription : 

HIR FEIT MIT MIR DER BITER TOT 
ER BRINGT MICH IN TOTS NO (nOTH). 

' ' Here fights with me the bitter death 
He brings me in death's agony." 

Five-plate stoves have two sides, 
a top and bottom and front, but 
are open at the back where they 
communicated with the jamb or 
chimney. Entire stoves of this sort 
are now exceedingly rare. The 
Museum collection of stove plates 

and stoves from southeastern Penn- Five-Plate Jamb Stove 

svlvania is now one of the most "The Dance of Death" 




BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



23 



representative, and abundantly illustrates 
the products of the furnaces of the 
eighteenth century- 
Mr. Mercer's book is the most com- 
plete and valuable contribution to the 
early history of iron work in the United 
States which has yet appeared. Copies 
may be obtained from The Bucks County 
Historical Society, Doylestown, Pa. 

E. A. B. 



ETRUSCAN ANTEFIX AND BUC- 

CHERO KANTHAROS FROM 

THE FRANCIS T. SULLY 

DARLEY BEQUEST 

Among the objects of art bequeathed 
by Mr. Francis T. Sully Darley to the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Indus- 
trial Art, which is a residuary legatee under 
his will, are a number of pieces of Etruscan 





Kantharos of Bucchero Ware. Etruscan 

Relief Decoration of Winged Sphinxes 

Darley Bequest 



Antefix. Etruscan 
Darley Bequest 

pottery. Among these the 
antefix, probably from Cor- 
neto or thereabouts where 
Greek art in the fourth and 
third centiunes B. C. wielded 
strongest influence. It is a 
fine head, well modeled and 
of strong character. Slight 
traces of color remain. 

Another piece, a Kan- 
tharos of bucchero ware, is 
also an excellent specimen 
of the type and exhibits 
the features that have led 
scholars to attribute buc- 
chero ware to a desire on 
the part of the potters to 
imitate metal ware imported 
from the East. This appears 
especially in the treatment 
of the handles, while the 
winged Sphinxes procession- 
ally disposed on the body 



I 



24 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANL\ MUSEUM 



of the Kantharos also point to an oriental origin. These pieces are a valuable addi- 
tion to the representative collection of Etruscan cerainics in the Museum, as 
good specimens of their respective order. 

S. Y. S. 



FRANKLIN PITCHER 

Recenth- added to the ceramic department is a Liverpool creamware 
pitcher decorated on one side with the well-known fur cap portrait of Benjamin 
Franklin, in black transfer printing. On the reverse is a laudatory inscription. 





This ]3itcher was doubtless made pre^'ious to Franklin's death, as the date 
of his birth only is given, which would place it at a rather early period for 
historical pottery of this character — previous to 1790. The majority of Liver- 
pool prints, bearing on American history, appeared between that date and 1810. 

E. A. B. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 25 

PAINTED COPY OF "THE LADY AND THE UNICORN" 

Mrs. Charles E. Dana has presented to the Pennsylvania Museum 
copies, painted on canvas with the most meticulous care, of two of the set of 
six tapestries of the late fifteenth century now in the Cluny Museum and 
known to connoisseurs as "The Lady with the Unicorn." The originals are 
among the great art treasures of the world. They are of the "mille fleurs" 
type — that is, the background is closely sprinkled over with small flowers, in 
Persian style. The lady, however, stands out clearly against it between a 
lion bearing the heraldic banner of the House of Le Viste, Lords of Fresne, one 
of whom in his day was president of the Paris Parliament. These tapestries 
once adorned the Chateau de Boussac, not far from Aubusson. Thev were 
given to the Cluny Museum by the Municipality of Boussac, by which they 
had been obtained with the Chateau in 1837. 

The conjunction of the lion with the unicorn in these tapestries is interest- 
ing, although as far as we know it has apparently never been noticed or at 
least studied. 

In copying the two pieces of the series, Mr. Dana with characteristic 
exactitude has carefully reproduced with his brush the coloring as well as the 
mass of minute detail of the originals, and the specimens will be invaluable 
to students. 

Mrs. Dana has also presented to the Museum two pieces of applique 
embroidery of the late fifteenth or early sixteenth century, which probably 
originally were cloth of gold appliqued on red satin, although at present only 
the linen background of the cloth remains. This is in bad condition, and in 
some latei age was pasted on paper oi it must have shredded away, the warp 
having completely disintegrated, leaving but the fiat linen weft. The smaller 
piece retains traces of tinsel gold thread which indicates the original character 
of the textile. The pieces were purchased by Mr. Dana in Florence at the 
sale of an artist who was giving up his studio. They were used in his own 
studio afterwards until the time of his death. Whether they were originally 
in the shape in which Mr. Dana got them — that is, in the shape of lambrequins 
— is improbable. 

The great period of Church embroidery was from the twelfth to the four- 
teenth centuries. In England, so expert were the workers that their products 
became famous as "Opus Anglicanum." This name, however, was especially 
attached to embroidered effects produced with chain-stitching. It is notable 
that the decadence in embroidery coincides with that of the art of illuminating 
MSS. from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries. It is believed that the 
development abroad of weaving figured and ornamented brocades, damasks 
and velvets is responsible for the falling off of the art. It came to pass that 
the designs, instead of being original paintings, for some of the early embroid- 
erers were illuminators or missal painters, such, for instance, were Dame 
Margot and Dame Aales in the thirteenth century. In the later period 
embroiderers often took their designs from woven patterns. In the fifteenth 
century in France and elsewhere every house had its salaried embroiderers. 
These kept in order the arras, also attending to the needlework of the household. 



26 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

Fine steel needles, which seem to have been a Spanish invention, came into 
use in England in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, although they appeared during 
that of MsLvy Tudor, but failed to find favor with the workers. After their 
adoption, the sixteenth century ran riot in embroidered luxiury. Everything 
was elaborately worked in all-over designs, scrolling stems, applique work in 
profusion on velvet, satin, cloth of gold and silver, as well as intricate scenes 
and complicated pictures, examples of which remain to attest the skill of the 
workers. 

s. y. S. 



NOTES 

The Museum has received from the Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, a pair of enormous vases which were the tcurs d? force of the exhibit 
of the Berlin Royal Porcelain Works at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago 
in 1893. These remarkable examples of ceramic art stand nine feet in height 
and are decorated with figures of cupids in relief, festoons of modeled porce- 
lain flowers and two large shield-shaped handles, terminating in modeled heads 
of vSatyrs, and bearing medallions enclosing paintings of children's heads. The 
bodies of the vases are glazed in royal blue and decorated with floral designs 
in gold. 

These are among the most important examples of hard paste porcelain ever 
made and in their manufacture difficulties have been overcome which only a 
manufacturer can fully appreciate. Fifty-four moulds were required to form 
the piece and the burning required the greatest skill, several similar pieces 
having been ruined in the kUns before the perfect one exhibited was obtained. 

Included in the gift is a large porcelain centerpiece for a dining table made 
by E. Gerard Dufrasseix & Co., Limoges, France. It consists of four basins 
with cupids or amorini in relief on the edges, and a finely modeled central 
group consisting of two women, a girl and a goat. 

* * * 

School Notes. — The Art Department united with several other art 
institutions of the city in a "Masque" of historic periods, with the object of 
experimenting for future combined work of this kind. 

The sixth century Byzantine period is the time chosen for the representation 
by the School; and the incident, the meeting of the Emperor Justinian and 
Theodora the Greek dancer. Miss Genevieve Gibbs and Mr. Warwick enact 
these two parts and about forty of the students from various classes fill the 
roles of the Patriarch, and other ecclesiastics, courtiers and court ladies, 
ambassadors, etc. 

All the costumes were designed and made in the School by members of 
the Costume Class and the vVlumni Association, and so far as possible they 
reproduce correctly the dress of the time, and almost all the materials are 
the genuine fabrics. Where stenciling was necessary the patterns have been 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 27 

derived from historic examples. They will be kept for the use of the decora- 
tion, illustration, and sketch classes. These additions to the already large num- 
ber in the possession of the School, and the bequest from the estate of the late 
Peter Moran of his fine collection of genuine American Indian costumes, make 
the problem of the care and preservation of the whole a matter of considerable 
difficulty. 

In a recent competition for the best design of the front of a semi-detached 
house for the Northeast Boulevard, the first three prizes and several of the 
honorable mentions were awarded to former pupils, the first prize being given 
to Aliss Helen C. Sowden, one of the very few women students entered in our 
architectural draw.'ng class. 

The Costtime Design Class, which was regularly organized this season, has 
produced very satisfactory results. The President of the Associate Committee 
of Women, and some other of the members, have had costumes designed (which 
are now in process of making) as a testimony to the artistic qualities of the 
students' work. For several years young women graduates of the School have 
been taking positions at very remunerative salaries in the large dressmaking 
houses and it is expected the new plan of this class will enable certain of those 
enrolled to establish themselves as independent designers. 

The School will, after this season, open about the middle of vSeptember 
and close about the middle of May, thus advancing the date a week. This 
will permit the holding of the commencement exercises and the exhibition 
before the majority of people interested leave town, and before the heat 
becomes so great as is usual, at the former period, in June. 

* * * 

It is planned to introduce a special class in the artistic requirem-cnts of 
printing establishments; the layouts for pages, covers, etc., and the best com- 
bination of colors, the forms of letters, numerals, and the whole effect of paper, 
ink, design, and workmanship. Mr. Edward Stem of the Advisory Committee 
has the matter in charge, and expects to effect an organization among the 
publishers and printers which will insure the success of the undertaking. 

* * * 

Mrs. John Harrison has presented a reproduction of the fine two-handled, 
Etruscan, red terra-cotta vase in the Capitoline Museum at Rome: a bust of 
Cosimo II di Medici, and another of an unknown man, from the originals in 
Florence, both in bronze, also reproduced by the Signa Company. 

* * * 

Miss Gertrude Abbott has presented a bronze Pompeian lamp, and a 
collection of nineteenth centur\' jewelry. Mr. H. H. Battles, some excep- 
tionally intricate Japanese stencils. From the estate of Charles E. Dana plaster 
casts and art materials have been received. 



28 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

Exhibits of School work have been sent out by the Alumni Association in 
the past three months as follows: 

University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Public Schools Chicago, 111. 

High Schools Richmond, Va.. 

Public Schools Buffalo, N. Y. 

Art Institute Indianapolis, Ind. 

Montana State College Bozeman, Mont. 

State Normal School Newark, N. J. 

State College Ames, Iowa 

School of Art Cleveland, Ohio 

Civic Association Roanoke, Va. 

Public Industrial Art School Philadelphia, Pa. 

Public Schools Homestead, Pa. 

(In most of these institutions the art work is in charge of our graduates.) 

Eastern Art Teachers Association Buffalo, N. Y. 

National Association of Cement Manufacturers Chicago, 111. 

^ ^ ^ 

Various exhibitions are scheduled for the near future, the most important 
being that to be held at Washington, D. C, under the auspices of the American 
Federation of Art. 

^ ^ ^ 

The Rosemont School Board has commissioned Mr. Sinnock to execute 
the decorations of its latest building, his designs submitted in competition 
being considered the best. The subjects are: 

Decoration in Sgraffito of the Vestibule. 

Landing of the Pilgrims. 

Presents for JMassasoic — The Faithful Friend of the White Man. 

The First Thanksgiving Day. 

* * * 

The various " Guilds," under the head of which the students ha^•e organiza- 
tions, arranged several informal talks to the members, and other students of 
the School. Mrs. Blankenburg spoke on "Efficiency;" Mr. Oalclej', Mr. F. H. 
Taylor, and Mr. Sprout on "Illustration." 

* * * 

This year's "Guild" has instituted simple open-air exercises in the north 
courtyard, directed by two of the members who have had experience in 
teaching good methods, and a brief interval in the morning is utilized most 
advantageoush' in this manner. 

An active movement has begun to advertise the School, and the home 
tovms and schools of the students are to be made acquainted -nnth the courses 
offered here. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



29 



ACCESSIONS 

January^March, 1915 



CLASS 



OBJECT 



Ceramics 



Furniture and 
Woodwork 



Glass 

Lacquers 
Metal work 



Musical 

Instruments 

Silversmith's 
Work. 
Jewelry, etc. 



Textiles 



5 Pieces of Pottery 

Maiolica Plate. Polychrome Decoration, Italian 

White Stoneware Pitcher, by Charles Meigh, Staf- 
fordshire, England, 1844 

Porcelain Bowl and 2 Porcelain Toddy Jugs, Canton, 
China, c. 1800 

Pottery Ewer and Bowl, Staffordshire, England, c. 
1830 

Hard Paste Porcelain Pitcher. Made at the Works of 
Judge Joseph Hemphill. Philadelphia, c. 1835 

Creamware Pitcher, Black Printed Portrait of Ben- 
jamin Franklin, Liverpool. England, c. 1790 



Small Wooden Box. Covered with Leather, American, 
Early Nineteenth Century 

Screen with Painted Figure Scenes, French 

Suite of Bedroom Furniture. Gilt Gesso and Painted 
Panels, Old Venetian 

Furniture for Colonial Bedroom — Four-Post Bed, 
Carved Mantelpiece, Pair of Gilt Girandoles. Gilt 
Convex Circular Mirror, Screen, Pictures, etc 

Carved Wooden Figure, Mexican, Seventeenth Cen- 
tury 



HOW ACQUIRED 



6 Pieces of Glass 

2 Pictures Painted on Glass. American. Early Nine- 
teenth Century 



Gold Lacquer Box, Japanese. 



Wrought Iron Hanging Chandelier 

5 Fire Insurance Plate?, Philadelphia. 1802-1875 

Iron Jack and Cake- Turner, Old American 

Pair of Spurs. Iron, Inlaid with Silver. Mexican, 

Seventeenth Century 

Ormolu Ornament. French. Empire Period 

Bronze Group, Russian, c. 1876 

Japanned Tin Coffee Pot, Philadelphia, c. 1830 

Small Bronze Idol, Thibet, Eighteenth Century 

Mandolin, Italian, Eighteenth Century 

Zanze. African. Nineteenth Century 



Pair of Spectacles with Silver Frames. Made by 
McAllister, Philadelphia, c. 1812 

18 Silver Teaspoons. 2 Salt Spoons. Sugar Tongs, and 
Silver Bracelet. Old American 

Gold Brooch. Black Agate with Mosaic Design 



Tray, Sheffield Plate. English. Late Eighteenth Cen- 
tury 

Reproductions of Costumes Worn by French Cavalier. 
French Directoire. Breton. Italian Mandolin Player, 
and Pope's Guard 

5 Pieces of Deep Flouncing and 8 Smaller Pieces of 
Point d'Alengon 

Cross-Stitched Linen Sampler, Large Canvas Pocket 
with AU-Over Design in Colored Worsteds, and 
Chinese Silk Purse 

2 Copies of Tapestries and 2 Embroidered Silk Lam- 
brequins 

2 Fragments of Embroidered Silk, Old French 

Silk Cap, Worn by Chinese Boy Actor 

Bride's Crown, Old Swiss 



Lent by Dr. Edwin A. Barber. 
Given by Mrs. John Harrison. 

Given by Miss Letitia A. Humphreys. 



Given by Mrs. Frederick T. Mason. 
Given by Mr. John T. Morris. 
By Purchase. 



Given by Mrs. Hampton L. Carson. 
Lent by Mrs. Harry Maybin Hart. 

Given by Miss Nina Lea. 



Given by Mrs. Frederick T. Mason. 

Given by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Lent by Dr. Edwin A. Barber. 

Given by Mrs. Frederick T. Mason. 

Given by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Lent by Mrs. Charles E. Dana. 
\ Given by Mrs. William D. Frishmuth. 

Given by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Given by Miss Juliana Wood. 
> By Purchase. 

Given by Miss M. K. Bent. 
By Purchase. 

Given by Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg. 

Given by Mrs. Hampton L. Carson." 
Given by Mr. and Mrs. Horace Howard 

Furness. Jr.. from the Estate of Mrs. 

Fairman Rogers. 

By Purchase. 



Given by Miss M. K. Bent. 
Given by Mrs. Henry P. Borie. 

Lent by Mrs. Hampton L. Carson. 

Lent by Mrs. Charles E. Dana. 
Bequest of Francis T. Sully Darley. 

\ Given by Mrs. William D. Frishmuth. 



30 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



ACCESSIONS.— Continued. 



CLASS 


OBJECT 


HOW ACQUIRED 


Textiles 


Quilted Silk Petticoat and Moire Silk Dress, Amer- 






Embroidered White Silk Shawl. Chinese 

5 Neckerchiefs, Embroidered Kerchief, Infants' Gar- 
ments, Girl's Muslin Dress, etc 


Furness. Jr.. from the Estate of Mrs. 
Fairman Rogers. 
Lent by Mrs. Harry Maybin Hart. 

Given by Mis? Letitia A. Humphreys. 


Miscellaneous 


10 Dolls 

Fan. Sandalwood and Paper, Painted Scenes, Chinese 


bury Hutchinson and Natalie Emlen 
Hutchmson. 
Lent by Miss Mary E. Sinnott. 

Given by Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg. 




Tortoise Shell Parasol 








Furness, Jr.. from the Estate of Mrs. 
Fairman Rogers. 




MEMBERSHIP 

The Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art desire the 
active co-operation of all public-spirited 
citizens who are known to be in sympathy 
with its educational work. All such persons 
are invited to become members. 

CLASSIFICATION OF MEMBERS 

Patron Members in Perpetuity — Those who 
contribute the sum of $5000 or more whether 
in money or objects for the Museum. 

Fellowship Members in Perpetuity — Those 
who contribute Si 000 at one time. 

Life Members — Those who contribute the 
sum of $100 or more at one time. 

Annual Members — Those who contribute 
not less than $10 yearly. 

The contributions received from Patrons 
($5000), and from Life Members ($100), are 
added to the permanent Endowment Fund. 
Contributions from Annual Members ($10) 
are used to the best advantage in the de- 
velopment of the Museuin and the School. 

ADVANTAGES OF MEMBERSHIP 

All members are entitled to the following 
benefits: 

The right to vote and transact business 
at the Annual Meeting. 

Invitations to all general receptions and 
exhibitions held at the Museum and the 
School. 

Free access to the Museum and School 
Libraries and admission to all lectures. 

Also a copy of each of the following pub- 
lications : 

The Annual Report of the Corporation. 

The Annual Circulars of the School of 
Apphed Art and the Philadelphia Textile 
School. 

The Art Handbooks and Art Primers, 
issued from time to time by the Museum 
(a printed list of publications will be mailed 
to any member on application). 

The Illustrated Quarterly Bulletin of the 
Museum. 

A list of members is published each year 
in the Annual Report. 

Applications for membership, and remit- 
tances should be sent to the Secretary, 
P. M. & S. I. A., Memorial Hall, Fairmount 
Park, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOURS OF ADMISSION 

The Musum is open, free to the public, 
every day in the year. 
Opening Hours: 
Mondays at 12 M. 
Other Week Days at 9.30 A. M. 
Sundays at 1 P. M. 
Closing Hours: 

During the summer months, 5 P. M. 

(Sundays, 6 P. M.) 
During the winter months, a half hour 
before sunset. 



CATALOGUES, HANDBOOKS, ETC. 

(On sale at the South Entrance) 

Handbook of the Museum SO . 25 

A Brief History of the Bayeux Tapestry . 10 
Cork Models of Windsor Castle, Tower 
of London, Westminster Abbey, 

Church of St. Peter, Rome 10 

The Great Seals of England 25 

Handbook of the Collection of Tulip 
Ware of the Pennsylvania-German 
Potters: 

Paper cover 1 . 00 

Large paper edition. Cloth 5 . 00 

Handbook of the Maiolica of Mexico: 

Paper cover 1 . 00 

Flexible Art Canvas 2 . 00 

Art Primer No. 3, Lead Glazed Pottery .50 
Art Primer No. 5, Tin Enameled Pot- 

terv 50 

Art Primer No. 6, Salt Glazed Stone- 
ware 50 

Art Primer No. 9, Hard Paste Porce- 
lain 50 

Art Primer No. 1 1 , Artificial Soft Paste 

Porcelain 50 

Bulletin of the Pennsylvania Museum 
(quarterly), per annum 1 . 00 



Friends of the Institution who desire 
to devise to it money should use the fol- 
lowing: 

Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath unto the Pennsyl- 
vania Museum and School of Industrial Art 

the sum of dollars 

for the use of the said Corporation. 

Witnesses 



Form of Devise of Real Estate 

I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art, its 
successors and assigns, all that certain (here 
insert a description of the property) for the 
use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses- 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



MUSEUM COMMITTEE 



John Story Jenks, Chairman 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
John H. McFadden 
John D. McIlhenny 
John T. Morris 
John W. Pepper 



Edgar V. Seeler 
Mrs. W. T. Carter 
Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 
Mrs. John Harrison 
Miss Fannie S. Magee 
Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts 



Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio 

Edwin AtLee Barber, Director of the Museum 

Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson, Assistant Curator and Lecturer 

HONORARY CURATORS 

Textiles, Lace and Embroidery Mrs. John Harrison 

Oriental Pottery Mrs. Jones Wister 

European Porcelain Rev. Alfred Duane Pell 

Arms and Armor Cornelius Stevenson 

Furniture and Woodwork Gustav Ketterer 

Musical Instruments Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 

Numismatics F. D. Langenheim 

Sculpture, Marbles and Casts Alexander Stirling Calder 

INSTRUCTION COMMITTEE 



Theodore C. Search, Chairman 
Charles Bond 
Mrs. John Harrison 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
John Story Jenks 
John D. McIlhenny 
Edgar V. Seeler 
James F. Sullivan 
William Wood 



Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison 
Mrs. F. K. Hipple 
Miss Nina Lea 
Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts 
Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 
Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 
Mrs. John Wister 
Mrs. Jones Wister 



Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg 

Second Vice-President 
Mrs. C. Leland Harrison 



First Vice-President 

Miss Nina Lea 

Secretary 

Mrs. Henry S. Grove 

Mrs. Edwin Swift Balch Mrs. 

Mrs. Jasper Ye.\tes Brinton Mrs. 

Mrs. John H. Brinton Miss 

Mrs. William T. Carter Mrs. 

Miss Margaret Clyde Mrs. 

Miss Margaret L. Corlies Mrs. 

Miss Ada M. Crozer Mrs. 

Mrs. David E. Dallam Mrs. 

Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison Mrs. 

Countess Santa Eulalia Miss 

Miss Cornelia L. Ewing Mrs. 
Mrs. George Harrison Frazier Mrs. 

Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth Mrs. 



Treasurer 

Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 



W. W. Gibbs Mrs. 

John Harrison Mrs. 

M. S. Hinchman Miss 

F. K. Hipple Mrs. 

Harold W. How Miss 

J. L. Ketterlinus Mrs. 

George G. M. Large Mrs. 

Robert R. Logan Mrs. 

Howard Longstreth Mrs. 

Fannie S. Magee Mrs. 

Arthur V. Meigs Mrs. 

James Mifflin Mrs. 
Francis F. Milne 



Thornton Oakley 
Charles Platt, 3d 
Elizabeth C. Roberts 
Thomas Roberts 
Mary E. Sinnott 
C. Shillard Smith 
Cornelius Stevenson 
Edward T. Stotesbury 
William H. Walbaum 
A. B. Weimer 
John Wister 
Jones Wister 



honorary member 
Mrs. M. Hampton Todd